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Bare bums and politics

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I'm thinking a lot about politics at the moment. Probably post-baby brain trying to kick back into gear, but also a little, I think, to do with the fact that you can't be HERE and not question what its all about. Being alone with two infants most of the time also provides ample opportunity to be stuck inside surfing the interweb, which, if you're like me can lead you down some freaky but usually quite fascinating rabbit-holes.

But I digress. I think what I want to reflect on is that what we see on our T.V back home really isn't reality. Not in my experience anyway. Not in Afghanistan. Not in America. And (so far, at least) not here. I like to call it the rise of irresponsible reporting, and its something thats becoming more and more noticeable. To me, anyway. I believe its a self fulfilling prophesy. When only bad news and sensationalism is beamed into every home each night on the news, society, and certainly the average joe who hasn't the means to explore or question further believes every shocking image. Its like a whole new opiate for the masses, and it seems to me the politicians are far too keen to jump on the band wagon.

In New Zealand, I would love to see the leader of the opposition come up with a couple of positive, new policies. Instead, I am bombarded with mud-slinging and finger pointing at how badly the other party is doing things. I support National (usually), but I think this is true regardless of who is in power. Why are my hard earned taxes paying the salaries of people who seem to do very little but squabble over who did what wrong?

The sad fact is that good news doesn't sell. Why is this? And when did it become acceptable for the news to make money?

As an aside. Islamic banking runs under the premise that its illegal for the banks to make a profit. Why doesn't the rest of the world subscribe to this? Perhaps America wouldn't be in such a hole if they had.

For those of you that haven't been spammed with Kony propaganda yet, check it out. I believe this campaign raises a number of interesting issues, starting with what right have other (usually richer) nations meddling in the affairs of others? Take it with a grain of salt, what ever you do. The video pulls at all the right emotions. But is it right?

A wise woman I know from University days posted this on her facebook page and it sums up what I want to say without writing a book.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8moePxHpvok

I spent a whole year with the Governor General as his Aide de Camp and we didn't attend one bad news story. A whole year. At least two engagements every day and it was all good news. Ordinary people achieving ordinary, and sometimes extraordinary things. It refreshed my faith in humanity, and I wish that everyone could experience it.

As to the title, despite the obvious correlation between politicians and arses, my real inspiration was watching my son roll around on the floor sans nappy (he has nappy rash, I'm giving his skin some air) and wondering if the world he's growing up in is really all that bad. I think probably not. Despite what the media will have you believe.

Posted by karicketts 23:15 Archived in Lebanon

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Comments

A thoughtful and accurate analysis; a great read!

I remember when I first discovered Google News several years ago, and read 3 different stories from papers in 3 different countries about a WHO report. Each story was entirely focused on decrying how badly that particular nation was doing in a particular measure. I then read the report itself, the general summary of which was how even across all the categories all the OECD countries were, and how all of the nations were top in at least one category and bottom in another.

While I was at university, I actually had a newspaper subscription and watched the TV news pretty regularly. Now, I generally ignore the spoon fed BS that constitutes TV news, and if I'm actually interested in a story I will try to read several perspectives on it.

Anyway, I look forward to reading more of your perspectives.

08.03.2012 by Graham

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